Electron microscopy

A Lot of Excitement in the Air!

Sia Afshari, Global Marketing Manager, EDAX

After all these years I still get excited about new technologies and their resulting products, especially when I have had the good fortune to play a part in their development. As I look forward to 2019, there are new and exciting products on the horizon from EDAX, where the engineering teams have been hard at work innovating and enhancing capabilities across all product lines. We are on the verge of having one of our most productive years for product introduction with new technologies expanding our portfolio in electron microscopy and micro-XRF applications.

Our APEX™ software platform will have a new release early this year with substantial feature enhancements for EDS, to be followed by EBSD capabilities later in 2019. APEX™ will also expand its wings to uXRF providing a new GUI and advanced quant functions for bulk and multi-layer analysis.

Our OIM Analysis™ EBSD software will also see a major update with the addition of a new Dictionary Indexing option.

A new addition to our TEM line will be a 160 mm² detector in a 17.5 mm diameter module that provides an exceptional solid angle for the most demanding applications in this field.

Elite T EDS System

Velocity™, EDAX’s low noise CMOS EBSD camera, provides astonishing EBSD performance at greater than 3000 fps with high indexing on a range of materials including deformed samples.

Velocity™ EBSD Camera

Last but not least, being an old x-ray guy, I can’t help being so impressed with the amazing EBSD patterns we are collecting from a ground-breaking direct electron detection (DED) camera with such “Clarity™” and detail, promising a new frontier for EBSD applications!
It will be an exciting year at EDAX and with that, I would like to wish you all a great, prosperous year!

Common Mistakes when Presenting EBSD Data

Shawn Wallace, Applications Engineer, EDAX

We all give presentations. We write and review papers. Either way, we have to be critical of our data and how it is presented to others, both numerically and graphically.

With that said, I thought it would be nice to start this year with a couple of quick tips or notes that can help with mistakes I see frequently.

The most common thing I see is poorly documented cleanup routines and partitioning. Between the initial collection and final presentation of the data, a lot of things are done to that data. It needs to be clear what was done so that one can interpret it correctly (or other people can reproduce it). Cleanup routines can change the data in ways that can either be subtle (or not so subtle), but more importantly they could wrongly change your conclusions. The easiest routine to see this on is the grain dilation routine. This routine can turn noisy data into a textured dataset pretty fast (fig. 1).

Figure 1. The initial data was just pure noise. By running it iteratively through the grain dilation routine, you can make both grains and textures.

Luckily for us, OIM Analysis™ keeps track of most of what is done via the cleanup routines and partitioning in the summary window on either the dataset level or the partition level (fig. 2).

Figure 2. A partial screenshot of the dataset level summary window shows cleanup routines completed on the dataset, as well as the parameters used. This makes your processing easily repeatable.

The other common issue is not including the full information needed to interpret a map. I really need to look at 3 things to get the full picture for an EBSD dataset: the IPF map (fig. 3), the Phase Map (fig. 4) and the IPF Legend (fig. 5) of those phases. This is very important because while the colors used are the same, the orientations differ between the different crystal symmetries.

Figure 3. General IPF Map of a geological sample. Many phases are present, but the dataset is not complete without a legend and phase map. The colors mean nothing without knowing both the phase and the IPF legend to use for that phase.

Below is a multiple phase sample with many crystal symmetries. All use Red-Green-Blue as the general color scheme. By just looking at the general IPF map (fig. 3), I can easily get the wrong impression. Without the phase map, I do not know which legend I should be using to understand the orientation of each phase. Without the crystal symmetry specific legend, I do not know how the colors change over the orientation space. I really need all these legends/maps to truly understand what I am looking at. One missing brick and the tower crumbles.

Figure 5. With all the information now presented, I can actually go back and interpret figure 3 using figures 4 and 5 to guide me.

Figure 4. In this multiphase sample, multiple symmetries are present. I need to know which phase a pixel is, to know which legend to use.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Being aware of these two simple ideas alone can help you to better present your data to any audience. The fewer the questions about how you got the data, the more time you will have to answer more meaningful questions about what the data actually means!

Happy Holidays from All of Us at EDAX!

Thank you to all the followers of our blog – we hope that you have been entertained, informed and amused by our posts this year. We will be taking a break until the second week of January 2019, but if you need any extra diversion over the holidays, don’t forget to take a look at the resources we have shared with you during the year and catch up on anything you may have missed.  We wish you a happy and healthy New Year and look forward to talking to you again in 2019.

All our on-demand webinars can be found here.  You can also find us on the following platforms:




EM Microanalysis Business in China

Harris Jiang, Regional Sales Manager, EDAX China

The FY2018 is coming to the end within one month. The Chinese EM market has increased dramatically in the past 10 years. According to the data that Prof. Zhang Ze (the CAS academician, Chairman of Asian EM association) provided at the 2018 Chinese EM meeting in October in Chengdu, Tsinghua University purchased the first unit of Cs-TEM in 2008. However, the total volume of this product has grown enormously since that time. As to the EM microanalysis (EDS-EBSD-WDS) market, the whole market capacity has expanded dramatically. Figure 1 clearly shows the number of TEMs and SEMs in China. ¹

Figure 1. Number of electron microscopes in China. Data is up to 2016.

With the increase in China’s economy, the Chinese market is becoming a crucial one with the largest potential for EM companies. Each single segment market deserves full attention and investment. The development of advanced materials and advanced industrial manufacturing relies on smart design and precise engineering. Microstructural control is key, and comprehensive facilities and expertise in electron microscopy are needed for this. NSFC has provided financial support for hundreds of projects in universities and research institutes in recent years. ² It needs to be pointed out that the term “industry market” does not necessarily imply low-end market and “academic market” does not mean high-end market either. For example, the electronic/ semiconductor industry will be a good segment market which we should focus on in the future. The Chinese Government has invested a huge amount of resources in it [3] – and this is a high-end one. They are asking vendors to offer the best high-level EDS to detect nanostructure of less than 10 nm. For most customers, we need to develop a complete workflow and application solution in the niche market rather than just the most advanced products, and this helps us to grow together.

EBSD in China is currently becoming a hot topic and key segment product, especially since 2016. It is promising that EBSD applications in China have increased greatly and continue to grow. Most researchers are trying to add EBSD on their SEMs. As a sales manager, I have plenty of opportunity to visit customers who are from various different backgrounds. Although their application needs are customized, the demand for EBSD is still growing. High-end EBSD customers need an EBSD detector with high speed and high sensitivity. EDAX is able to offer different EBSD solutions tailored to a variety of applications and requirements. We are taking a long-term vision and expecting a tremendous change in the next ten years. We need to think bigger and more!

At EDAX we will be improving our product offerings in the coming years by developing specific application solutions and products for better cooperation with leading customers in each market segment. Secondly, we will also promote the capability of the service and application teams by developing a comprehensive training system and strengthening our human resources in China. Lastly, we are enhancing team collaboration and improving efficiency by clarifying the responsibilities of positions and optimizing internal communication.

For the Chinese market, EDAX provides specific EDS and EBSD products to both entry-level and high-end customers in each niche market. We believe that in the coming months and years we will be able to provide more solutions for customers’ fundamental research and technology development. We are hoping that we will have a bright future with the Chinese market.

References:
1. Ze Zhang, Xiaodong Han, Nature Materials volume 15, pages 695–697 (2016)
2. China Nature Science Foundation supports projects in 2017 [in Chinese] http://www.nsfc.gov.cn/publish/portal0/tab434/info70085.htm
3. China shatters annual fab construction investment record at US$7 Billion in 2018. http://www.semi.org/en/highlights-august-2018-edition-fab-databases